Category Archives: The Elements of Hip-Hop

What is Hip-Hop???

I look to the Hip Hop Declaration Of Peace for that answer.

The HipHop Declaration of Peace was presented to the United Nations Organization on May 16th 2001. It was signatured by various organizations such as: Temple Of Hip Hop, Ribbons International, UNESCO and also by 300 Hip-Hop activists, pioneers and UN delegates.

In the first place this document recognises Hip-Hop as an international culture of peace and prosperity. It is also a set of principles which advise all Hip-Hoppers on how to sustain the peaceful character of Hip Hop Kulture and to form worldwide peace.

Additionally this declaration is meant to show Hip-Hop as a positive phenomenon which has nothing in common with the negative image of Hip Hop as something that corrupts young people and encourages them to break the law. KRS One, Pop Master Fabel, Afrika Bambaataa, Ralph Mc Daniels and HarryAllen were some of the people who had their share in creating the declaration.

The Hip Hop Declaration Of Peace

This Hiphop Declaration of Peace guides Hiphop Kulture toward freedom from violence, and establishes advice and protection for the existence and development of the international Hiphop community. Through the principles of this Hiphop Declaration of Peace we, Hiphop Kulture, establish a foundation of Health, Love, Awareness, Wealth, peace and prosperity for ourselves, our children and their children’s children, forever.

For the clarification of Hiphop’s meaning and purpose, or when the intention of Hiphop is questioned, or when disputes between parties arise concerning Hiphop; Hiphoppas shall have access to the advice of this document, The Hiphop Declaration of Peace, as guidance, advice and protection.

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First Principle

Hiphop (Hip’Hop) is a term that describes our independent collective consciousness. Ever growing, it is commonly expressed through such elements as Breakin, Emceein, Graffiti Art, Deejayin, Beatboxin, Street Fashion, Street Language, Street Knowledge and Street Entrepreneurialism. Wherever and whenever these and future elements and expressions of Hiphop Kulture manifest; this Hiphop Declaration of Peace shall advise the use and interpretation of such elements, expressions and lifestyle.

Second Principle

Hiphop Kulture respects the dignity and sanctity of life without discrimination or prejudice. Hiphoppas shall thoroughly consider the protection and the development of life, over and before the individual decision to destroy or seek to alter its natural development.

Third Principle

Hiphop Kulture respects the Laws and agreements of its culture, its country, its institutions and whomever it does business with. Hiphop does not irresponsibly break Laws and commitments.

Fourth Principle

Hiphop is a term that describes our independent collective consciousness. As a conscious way of life, we acknowledge our influence on society, especially on children; and we shall forever keep the rights and welfare of both in mind. Hiphop Kulture encourages womanhood, manhood, sisterhood, brotherhood, childhood and family. We are conscious not to bring any intentional disrespect that jeopardizes the dignity and reputation of our children, elders and ancestors.

Fifth Principle

The ability to define, defend and educate ourselves is encouraged, developed, preserved, protected and promoted as a means toward peace and prosperity, and toward the protection and the development of our self-worth. Through knowledge of purpose and the development of our natural and learned skills, Hiphoppas are encouraged to always present their best work and ideas.

Sixth Principle

Hiphop Kulture honors no relationship, person, event, act or otherwise wherein the preservation and further development of Hiphop’s culture, principles and elements are not considered or respected. Hiphop Kulture does not participate in activities that clearly destroy or alter its ability to productively and peacefully exist. Hiphoppas are encouraged to initiate and participate in fair trade and honesty in all negotiations and transactions.

Seventh Principle

The essence of Hiphop is beyond entertainment: The elements of Hiphop Kulture may be traded for money, honor, power, respect, food, shelter, information and other resources; however, Hiphop and its culture cannot be bought, nor is it for sale. It cannot be transferred or exchanged by or to anyone for any compensation at any time or at any place. Hiphop is the priceless principle of our self-empowerment. Hiphop is not a product.

Eighth Principle

Companies, corporations, non and not-for-profit organizations, as well as individuals and groups that are clearly benefiting from the use, interpretation and/or exploitation of the term Hiphop, (i.e. Hip Hop, hip-hop,) and the expressions and terminologies of Hiphop, (i.e. Hip Hop, hip-hop,) are encouraged to commission and/or employ a full-time or part-time certified Hiphop cultural specialist to interpret and answer sensitive cultural questions regarding the principles and proper presentations of Hiphop’s elements and culture; relative to businesses, individuals, organizations, communities, cities, as well as other countries.

Ninth Principle

May 3rd is Rap Music Day. Hiphoppas are encouraged to dedicate their time and talent to self-development and for service to their communities. Every third week in May is Hiphop Appreciation Week. During this time, Hiphoppas are encouraged to honor their ancestors, reflect upon their cultural contributions and appreciate the elements and principles of Hiphop Kulture. November is Hiphop History Month. During this time Hiphoppas are encouraged to participate in the creating, learning and honoring of Hiphop’s history and historical cultural contributors.

Tenth Principle

Hiphoppas are encouraged to build meaningful and lasting relationships that rest upon Love, trust, equality and respect. Hiphoppas are encouraged not to cheat, abuse, or deceive their friends.

Eleventh Principle

The Hiphop community exists as an international culture of consciousness that provides all races, tribes, religions and styles of people a foundation for the communication of their best ideas and works. Hiphop Kulture is united as one multi-skilled, multi-cultural, multi-faith, multi-racial people committed to the establishment and the development of peace.

Twelfth Principle

Hiphop Kulture does not intentionally or voluntarily participate in any form of hate, deceit, prejudice or theft at any time. At no time shall Hiphop Kulture engage in any violent war within itself. Those who intentionally violate the principles of this Declaration of Peace or intentionally reject its advice, forfeit by their own actions the protections set forth herein.

Thirteenth Principle

Hiphop Kulture rejects the immature impulse for unwarranted acts of violence and always seeks diplomatic, non-violent strategies in the settlement of all disputes. Hiphoppas are encouraged to consider forgiveness and understanding before any act of retaliation. War is reserved as a final solution when there is evidence that all other means of diplomatic negotiation have failed repeatedly.

Fourteenth Principle

Hiphoppas are encouraged to eliminate poverty, speak out against injustice and shape a more caring society and a more peaceful world. Hiphop Kulture supports a dialogue and action that heals divisions in society, addresses the legitimate concerns of humankind and advances the cause of peace.

Fifteenth Principle

Hiphoppas respect and learn from the ways of Nature, regardless of where we are on this planet. Hiphop Kulture holds sacred our duty to contribute to our own survival as independent, free-thinking beings in and throughout the Universe. This planet, commonly known as Earth is our nurturing parent and Hiphoppas are encouraged to respect Nature and all creations and inhabitants of Nature.

Sixteenth Principle

Hiphop’s pioneers, legends, teachas, elders, and ancestors shall not be inaccurately quoted, misrepresented, or disrespected at anytime. No one should profess to be a Hiphop pioneer or legend unless they can prove with facts and/or witnesses their credibility and contributions to Hiphop Kulture.

Seventeenth Principle

Hiphoppas are encouraged to share resources. Hiphoppas should give as freely and as often as possible. It is the duty of every Hiphoppa to assist, whenever possible, in the relief of human suffering and in the correction of injustice. Hiphop is shown the highest respect when Hiphoppas respect each other. Hiphop Kulture is preserved, nurtured and developed when Hiphoppas preserve, nurture and develop one another.

Eighteenth Principle

Hiphop Kulture maintains a healthy, caring and wealthy, central Hiphop guild fully aware and invested with the power to promote, teach, interpret, modify and defend the principles of this Hiphop Declaration of Peace.

Content Source: https://thetempleofhiphop.wordpress.com/hip-hop-declaration-of-peace/

11 Years Running! The Annual Brooklyn Hip-Hop Festival 2015

Photos and Article by Tyrone Z. McCants / Zire Photography

July 11th, 2016 marked the 11th annual Brooklyn Hip-Hop Festival—a celebration of not only music but the progress of the culture in entirety. I had the honor of being present at the event, which for me is another box checked on the list. The festival was birthed in 2005, integrating some of the most revered names with a background in hip-hop.  It is vital to understand that this gathering is not merely artists gracing a stage.  This year’s Brooklyn Hip-Hop Festival include the first Hip-Hop Institution conference, the Juice Hip-Hop Exhibition, the Dummy Clap Film Festival, Beats and Eats and the Big Show. The number of attendees increases every year, and the energy of the events reaches immense levels.

For those of you who have never had the privilege of attending BHF, allow me to recreate the scene.  If ever you have dreamt of a fantastical realm in which conscious hip-hop rules, let it be known that this dream exists in BHF.  The headliner was none other than Common—the renaissance man himself.  Other appearances on the set list included Mobb Deep, Freeway, John Robinson, Brooklyn natives Stro, Skyzoo, Rob Swift, and video pioneer Ralph McDaniels.  You simply cannot err with such a cast of greats.  Each performer contributed to the colorful atmosphere of the occasion. From Torae freestyling about What is Hip-Hop, to Lion Babe kicking it with the crowd, to live instrumental by the PVD band and Sean Taylor, every time the stage was blessed, the festival-goers showed nothing but admiration and respect. It was a musical love fest to the fullest.

The highlight of the 2015 Brooklyn Hip-Hop Festival, for me, was Foxy Brown as a surprise performer.  Foxy remains to be one of the most respected contenders in the game. Common brought out the reigning rapper himself, which he explained to AllHipHop:

“I feel like its fly to bring her [Foxy] out because she’s fly. You can picture certain people that Common may bring out but, Foxy Brown is no another level, it’s like something unique and fresh and different.”

I concur, Common.  Known for her great panache, Fox Boogie put it down for us with “Oh yeah”, a favorite of mine.  Imagine the tide of nostalgia that descended the crowd (definitely over myself) at the commencement of that unforeseen bestowal.

Besides Foxy Brown, other surprise happenings included Consequence, large professor (another favorite of mine), and Sean Taylor taking the stage.  BHF 2015 embodied the true essence of “Hip-Hop’s Birthday in July”.  Overall, the event has become a benchmark for the continuation of striving for a cultural celebration.

The founder, Wes Jackson, received a proclamation from the Borough President of Brooklyn, Eric Adams presented by Councilwoman Laurie Cumbo.  What better testament to progression? I’d give this year’s gathering a solid “Starquake” on the Richter scale.

Photography by Tyrone Z. McCants / Zire Photography

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David Bars talks about hip-hop and his new project.

TWIHHP had an interview with Bronx NYC artist – David Bars at the famous D.I.T.C (Diggin In The Crates) Studios. David Bars talks about his view on the state of hip-hop, his roots to the culture, and his new upcoming project.

David Bars releases his first single off his upcoming project “In Bars We Trust” Set to release 1-1-18 free digital download available everywhere. Follow David Bars: Instagram @davidbars_ Twitter @davidbarsinc https://soundcloud.com/davidbars ———————————— ▶️ SUBSCRIBE TO THE CHANNEL – http://bit.ly/ZPGYTChannel ✅ VISIT THE WEBSITE AT – http://bit.ly/TWIHHPonline “The What Is Hip-Hop Project | Taking it back to Roots” by Tyrone Z. McCants | @ZirePhotos INSTAGRAM: @thewhatishiphopproject http://www.instagram.com/thewhatiship… TWITTER: @twihhp https://twitter.com/twihhp FACEBOOK LIKE PAGE: https://www.facebook.com/TWIHHP/

What Is Hip-Hop Rap by Torae

Rapper Torae does a freestyle off the top at the Brooklyn Hip-Hop Festival 2015

Follow Torae:
Instagram: @Torae
Twitter: @Torae

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Prodigy, was one of the illest storytellers to ever grace the culture.

Article via OkayPlayer.com

Extremely sad news, rap fans, as the legendary Mobb Deep lyricist Prodigy has passed away. According to his fellow Queensbridge rap savant, Nasir Jones, the man born Albert Johnson has shed his mortal coil. No other details have been offered and we will continue to follow along with the story as it develops.

Born in Hempstead, New York, raised in Queens, Prodigy became a member of the street-wise duo Mobb Deep. His grandfather, Budd Johnson, and his great-uncle Keg Johnson were strong contributors to the Bebop era of jazz, making Prodigy just that for music at a young age. Nas helped to raise public consciousness about Prodigy and Havoc, as the single, “Shook Ones Pt. 2,” raced up the hip-hop charts.

An album fueled by the inner city experiences of the then-young lyricists, The Infamous and Hell on Earth became hip-hop classics, studied by the likes of EminemCapone-N-Noreaga and more.

The group’s publicist issued a statement confirming the news stating:

“It is with extreme sadness and disbelief that we confirm the death of our dear friend Albert Johnson, better known to millions of fans as Prodigy of legendary NY rap duo Mobb Deep. Prodigy was hospitalized a few days ago in Vegas after a Mobb Deep performance for complications caused by a sickle cell anemia crisis. As most of his fans know, Prodigy battled the disease since birth. The exact causes of death have yet to be determined. We would like to thank everyone for respecting the family’s privacy at this time.”

Rhythm Roulette: Havoc

Video by Mass Appeal – In this episode of Rhythm Roulette, Mass Appeal linked with Havoc of Mobb Deep to show us why he’s considered a living legend.

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23 Years Anniversary – The Birth Of Jeru The Damaja’s 1st Solo Album

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A Sucker EMCEE, a one-man show from Craig “Mums” Grant | OkayPlayer

a sucker emcee

Article source: http://www.okayplayer.com/news/a-sucker-emcee-craig-mums-grant.html

In 2014, the LAByrinth Theater Company produced A Sucker EMCEE, a one-man show from Craig “Mums” Grant. Grant, a poet and actor, used hip-hop and rhymes to tell his life story, from a young boy in the Bronx to a great success in the acting field — he appeared on HBO’s OZ — to back to the Bronx again.

Three and a half years after the play’s initial run, the show is coming back, this time at the National Black Theatre in Harlem.

The show will have a limited six-show engagement. The original production team, which included director Jenny KoonsDJ Rich Medina and set designer David Meyer, are all returning, so expect the same quality as the initial show.

Tickets for A Sucker EMCEE are on sale now and cost $25 in advance and $35 at the door. The show will run from April 26 through April 30, 2017, so jump on this quickly.

April 26 through April 30th
Nationalblacktheatre.org

Black Moon Returns To The Studio 2016

Video by  Duck Down Music

To celebrate the rare occurrence of the Black Moon, Buckshot & DJ Evil Dee went to the studio and worked on some new music. Stay tuned.

Video by @dlpivmusic (Instagram)

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