Category Archives: Photography

Photo Gallery of random images reflecting Hip-Hop.

23 Years Anniversary – The Birth Of Jeru The Damaja’s 1st Solo Album

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GMD – Grandmaster Dee

A photo posted by What Is Hip-Hop? (@thewhatishiphopproject) on Dec 13, 2016 at 5:40pm PST

Along with being an active member of Whodini, Grandmaster Dee has also made a name for himself as a DJ. He is internationally renowned for being able to scratch with almost every conceivable part of his anatomy. He has also been praised for his ability to access all genres of music reaching many different demographics. He is a featured artist by Stanton Magnetics, an industry leader in the design and manufacture of professional audio products. 

 

Arizona Celebrates Its 3rd Annual Hip-Hop Festival

November 14, 2016, Respect The Underground showed their contribution to the hip-hop culture by hosting their 3rd Annual Arizona Hip-Hop festival at the  Comerica Theatre in Phoenix, Arizona.  When I got to the downtown Phoenix area, I was not sure if I was in the right place.

Being a New york native that recently covered the Brooklyn Hip-Hop Festivals and the Rock Steady Crew Anniversary, I was used to being backed up in traffic for 5 blocks before reaching the venues.

I found parking about a block away and the moment I turned off the car engine, I heard the music’s Base. The sound of hip-hop was in the air from a couple of blocks away and I was excited to be there. It’s amazing how you can walk a radius of 3 blocks in some communities and the entire culture can change.

Behind the ticket gate was a live stage performance right outside with hundreds of Hiphoppas everywhere. Young and old, artists and fans mixing up at what seemed to be the hip-hop heartbeat of Phoenix Arizona.

The Lineup for the 2016 AZ Hip Hop Festival was estimated to present 245  local artists.

Walking in the venues, there were music artists signing autographs, with 50  vendors from clothing designer, tattoo artist,  creating designs, food trucks, and another stage with another set of local artists moving the crowd.

There was a deejays and producers section at the event were Arizona’s premier and upcoming music makers played new music and original beats. All that was just in the lobby of the Comerica Theatre.

Entering the arena, on the balcony right above the stage lined a collection of 25 local graffiti artists, visual artists, and painters.

The Stage… What a show. Every show, every stage, every artist represented to the fulliest… The emcees had Delivery, Flow and Stage Presence, each artist gave an energy filled show.

Shout out to the Hiphoppas who showed up and supported the event, the artists and the culture.

To learn more about “Respect The Underground – visit them here ->
www.respecttheunderground.com

Check out these artists

Beats – @WIFyeBeats

Digital Art – www.tkart.co

Engineering – Facebook.com/CharlieBlaze

Tattoo Artist – Facebook.com/hanaleikialoa

Radio – EylRadio.com

Artist / Designer / Painter – Art By Porgia

Headphones – www.exeoent.com

Photography – www.ZirePhotography.com

 

 

 

 

RECAP: Brooklyn Hip Hop Festival Summer 2014

BY SENORKAOS – THURS, JULY 24, 2014 

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DJ Rob Swift on the 1s and 2s at the Brooklyn Hip-Hop Festival BHFX

2 weekends ago I was honored with the chance to attend the Brooklyn Hip Hop Festival. Tickets were provided, so I had to make the pilgrimage to NYC to check it out.

The festival similar to the A3C Fest in ATL is celebrating it’s 10th year in operation this year.

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The Legendary Brand Nubian at the Brooklyn Hip-Hop Festival BHFX

Hosted in a vacant lot in Williamsburg, Brooklyn (right off the East River) it was a beautiful sunny day for an outside concert for sure. When I arrived Tanya Morgan joined by Spec Boogie were getting on stage. I dipped out and missed a few acts including Brand Nubian, Beatnuts, and who knows who else. Luckily I looked at the BKHHF website that morning, and noticed that Jay Electronica’s set time had been moved up to an earlier time. The post mentioned his set would be epic, and there would be special guests you didn’t want to miss. 

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Video Music Box, VJ Ralph McDaniels at the Brooklyn Hip-Hop Festival BHFX

30 minutes after his initial set time though, his DJ was still spinning his actual songs to the crowd. The host Uncle Ralph McDaniels and other staff looked like they were stalling, the sound engineer kept checking mics (as if the mics weren’t crispy already from the last performance). I started thinking to myself did this just turn into a Jay Elec listening party? Is he here? Will their be a show? 

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Jay Electronica at the Brooklyn Hip-Hop Festival BHFX

And FINALLY… Jay graced the stage flanked by a crew of brothers dressed in F.O.I (Fruit Of Islam) garb. Once he appeared, I must say he definitely gave the crowd a show.

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Jay Electronica at the Brooklyn Hip-Hop Festival BHFX
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Jay Electronica, Talib Kwali and Mac Miller perform at the Brooklyn Hip-Hop Festival BHFX
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Jay Electronica and Mac Miller at the Brooklyn Hip-Hop Festival BHFX
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Talib Kwali, Jay Cole and Jay Electronica at the Brooklyn Hip-Hop Festival BHFX

The hour long set featured all the joints you would probably expect to hear in a Jay Elect set: “Eternal Sunshine,” “Exhibit A (Transformations)”, “Exhibit C,” etc. Special guests included Mac Miller (who straight forgot whatever verse he was supposed to be spitting) which turned into freestyle session between the two. There was also Talib Kweli, and J-Cole who seemed to appear and disappear rather quickly. The show was going great and had no one else appeared on stage with Jay, I would of been perfectly fine with that.   But being the magician Jay Elect is, or course he had a trick up his sleeve and that was none other than Jay-Z himself.

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“It Feels Good To Be Home!” Jay-Z says to the crowd at the Brooklyn Hip-Hop Festival BHFX

Hov didn’t just pop up to rock the couple cuts he has with Jay Elect, he set it off by his rendition of “Young, Gifted, and Black,” and even gave the crowd a treat of “P.S.A.” as well as his joints with Jay Elect including the latest “We Made It.”

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Jay Electronica and Jay-Z perform live at the Brooklyn Hip-Hop Festival BHFX
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Spike Lee talks to the community at the Brooklyn Hip-Hop Festival BHFX

I took a bunch of camera phone pics, and even got some video. Then I saw all these fly pictures and HD video, and put my stuff in the archives. HA. 
Oh… and before you see these videos, I must mention I ran into Spike Lee who had a 40 Acres Pop Up Shop set up at the fest. I treated myself to a T-shirt and a “Do The Right Thing” behind the scenes book which Spike actually signed… Not too bad considering where we were a few years back! HA.

Jay Z Joins Jay Electronica For “Young Gifted… by BKHipHopFestival

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Raekwon The Chef performs live at the Brooklyn Hip-Hop Festival BHFX

After this.. CJ Pro Era rocked, and Raekwon did his thing with a few brooklyn guest including AZ, Masta Killa, Troy Ave, and Papoose. But too be honest nothing quite surpassed the energy of the moment seen above.

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Masta Killa joins the stage with Raekwon The Chef at the Brooklyn Hip-Hop Festival BHFX

Pics courtesy of Tyrone Z. McCants of Zire Photography. See Full Gallery Here

Shouts to the homie Navani, Suce, Dillon, E Holla, and everybody else I got a chance to connect with during my brief stay in NYC.

Until next time… 

via: http://www.thekaoseffect.com/recap-brooklyn-hip-hop-festival-summer-2014

Best Dance Moments | Breaking Forever 2015

Photos by ZirePhotosNYC

Featured images from the Breakin at the Bk Juice Hip-Hop Exhibition and Whodini and UTFO share the Stage at RSC38 galleries.

Video by ProDance TV

The Original Hip-Hop Photographer, Joe Conzo at The Revolution of Hip-Hop Exhibition

Revisit the Golden Age of Hip-Hop at New Photo Exhibit

Joe Conzo, “Almighty KG of the Cold Crush Brothers at Harlem World,” 1981. Courtesy of the photographer

Rewinding to the days of gold chains, hoop earrings, and sneakers with no laces, a new hip-hop photography exhibition is on its way to Museum of the City of New York. HIP-HOP REVOLUTION: Photographs by Janette Beckman, Joe Conzo, and Martha Cooper presents the work of three photographers who were paramount in proliferating the look and feel of hip-hop in its infancy. “In New York’s long history, the creativity born of the city’s density and diversity has brought enormous riches to the world,” says Susan Henshaw Jones, Ronay Menschel Director of the Museum of the City of New York. “Hip-hop is yet another incredibly vibrant example of how the world has been shaped by what started in New York. You can see this dynamic and influential music and culture come to life in this exhibition through the powerful photographs of three wonderful photographers.”

HIP-HOP REVOLUTION, which follows the museum’s 2014 graffiti art exhibition, features over 100 original photographs taken between 1977 and 1990, starring the likes of Afrika Bambaata, Queen Latifah, Run DMC, and a very skinny Busta Rhymes. The shutterbugs themselves run the gamut, from “the man who took hip-hop’s baby pictures,” Joe Conzo, to Kodakgirl, a.k.a. documentarian Martha Coooper, to iconic music photographer Janette Beckman, who is credited for helping create “the public face of hip-hop,” according to Museum of the City of New York.

(L to R) Martha Cooper, “Little Crazy Legs strikes an impromptu pose during Wild Style shoot, Riverside Park, Manhattan,” 1983. Courtesy of the Photographer. Janette Beckman, “Afrika Bambaataa,” 1983. Courtesy of the Photographer

“We’re seeing in these photographs the foundation of what many people consider a way of life today,” explains Curator of Prints & Photographs for the Museum, and HIP-HOP REVOLUTION producer, Sean Corcoran. Beckman, Conzo, and Cooper’s works “show the development of a culture from the grassroots, and these photographers were part of propagating the culture to ever expanding audiences,” he continues. “This is really a New York story.”

Janette Beckman, “Eric B & Rakim” NYC, 1987. Courtesy of the Photographer

Designed by Marissa Martonyi, the exhibition also contains newspaper clippings, music listening stations, books, flyers, and other artifacts of the era, and even offers special programs for students and teachers.

Check out some of the awesome images in the show below, and visit Museum of the City of New York to learn more.

Janette Beckman, “LL Cool J with Cut Creator, E-Love, and B-Rock,” 1986. Courtesy of the Photographer

(L to R) Janette Beckman, “Salt-N-Pepa,” “Busta Rhymes (Leaders of the New School).” Courtesy of the Photographer

Joe Conzo, “JDL at Skatin’ Palace,” 1981. Courtesy of the photographer 

Martha Cooper, “High Times Crew breaking outside transit police station, Washington Heights, Manhattan,” 1980. Courtesy of the Photographer

Joe Conzo, “Tony Tone and Kool Herc Backstage at T-Connection,” 1979. Courtesy of the Photographer 

HIP-HOP REVOLUTION: Photographs by Janette Beckman, Joe Conzo, and Martha Cooper was held on April 1, 2015 through September 13, 2015 at Museum of the City of New York.

Honor and Respect to Joe Conzo for his accomplishments and contribution to Hip-Hop!!! Here are some images from the event.

Video – News1 – Hip-Hop’s Roots Traced in New East Harlem Exhibit

Breakin at the Bk Juice Hip-Hop Exhibition

BkHipHopFest15 – BK Juice Hip-Hop-Exhibition – Dance Off – LiteFeet

My best moment in this momentous event was experiencing the ‘Dance Off.’  at Littlefield in Gowanus, Brooklyn.

This dance style for hip hop began in Harlem and was formed in 2005 -2006 in a range of 10 years; various dancers have created and shaped it. Litefeet consists of various dance trends which combine together like the Harlem shake, chicken noodle soup, the bad one and tone wop; however, it is made up of dance moves numbering 20 and more.

The two crews that presented the LiteFeet Dance off were CHRYBABY COZIE & LITE FEET NATION and WAFFLE NYC. Participating DJs were KERIM THE DJ, DJ MIDNITEDJ E DOUBLE and 1200 SQUAD. In the middle of the performance, Pop Master Fabel of the Rock Steady Crew jumped in and did his thing.

Photography by Tyrone Z. McCants of ZirePhotography.com / @ZirePhotos

I left this hip-hop event more assured and appreciative about the evolution of the Hip-Hop culture, that the knowledge and legacy of this culture is in good hands with the new generation of hip-hop heads. The movement of love and vibration is only growing and gaining back its power and will continue expanding and evolving!

Graffiti and Art at the Bk Juice Hip-Hop Exhibition

On July 20, 2015, I had the pleasure of attending the Juice Hip-Hop Exhibition at Littlefield in Brooklyn, New York

The event was organized by Juels Pierrot of Juice Inc. whose aim is to channel Hip-Hop culture into the future and at the same time maintain honesty. They organized this event in collaboration with Brooklyn Bodega to enhance this culture by bringing together the latest upcoming deejays, dancers, sneaker heads, emcees as well as visual artists under one roof.

We were treated to a variety of interesting presentations like Tidal Show and Prove Showcase, Dance Off, Salute the DJ, Beat Showcase, Art Gallery and Sneaker Gallery.

We all learnt a lot from this event such as the role of hip-hop ingredients in Hip-Hop culture, as illustrated below:

One of the Hip-Hop Ingredients was Graffiti and Art 

Graffiti and Art Gallery 

The role of art in Hip-Hop culture was emphasized to us by artists such as Rebecca Maria and Lavan Wright who displayed some of their great works. These individuals used art to express this culture. Initially, they used graffiti but this has transformed to painting, film making and photography. This ingredient is a representation of all that is vital to this culture; this can be touched and seen.

The initial presentation of the culture of hip hop was graffiti. The codes and messages portrayed via graffiti documented whatever was taking place at that particular time; it was a method of the youth expressing themselves via art. Today, graffiti remains our imaginative indication of our societies and of ourselves.

Art by Lavan Wright

Grafitti Art The JUICE Hip-Hop Exhibition

Art Rebecca Maria – Paid in Full themed

Photos by ZirePhotos – Replica of a Replica of a Replica

I left this hip-hop event more assured and appreciative about the evolution of the Hip-Hop culture, that the knowledge and legacy of this culture is in good hands with the new generation of hip-hop heads. The movement of love and vibration is only growing and gaining back its power and will continue expanding and evolving!

Hip-Hop History when Marley, Kane, Kool G, Craig G and Masta Ace performed the Symphony Live at RSC38

The great Big Daddy Kane also headlined the 38th Annual Rock Steady Crew concert at Summerstage Central Park. The smooth operator emcee, whose rich baritone ensures you pay attention to his unique rap lyrics, nearly caused a stampede when he brought out his fellow pioneers and artists Kool G Rap, Masta Ace, Craig G and legendary producer Marley Marl to perform the ‘Symphony’ which is a classic hip-hop hit.

Kane had more surprise guests for the hip-hop fans, he invited Hip-Hop Pioneers Rodney Stone of Funky Four Plus One and Easy A.D. from the Cold Crush Brothers.